psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present

:Episode One Hundred Fifty-Nine: 10.11.2019

Artist Title Album
The Beat of the EarthThis Is An Artistic Statement (Part 1)The Beat of the Earth
Tim BuckleyGypsy WomanHappy Sad
Allah-LasHolding PatternLahs
Ernest HoodSaturday Morning DozeNeighborhoods
Malaria!Thrash MeCompiled 2.0 / 1981-84
Tom of EnglandSong of the Sex MonkSex Monk Blues
Theodore Cale SchaferHunterPatience
Fumio MiyashitaBreathWave Sounds of the Universe
Vibracathedral OrchestraThrough Coming WindowSqueeze the Lids/Through Coming Window 12"
ELEHCollect Yourself/Well ArrangedLiving Space
EmptysetBladeBlossoms
Listen at House of Sound

Listen on Spotify

 

Description

Among the highlights of this week's show:

A vintage late-sixties freakout by The Beat of the Earth, the initial musical outing by Phil Pearlman, a multi-instrumentalist whose subsequent projects, The Electronic Hole - a dark, dirgey VU knock-off - and Relatively Clean Rivers - often described (aptly, I think) as a version of the Grateful Dead for people who hate the Grateful Dead (i.e. it's stripped of their most insufferable tendencies e.g. endless noodling) - I've played in the past. I can't say why The Beat of the Earth has never, in nearly four years, found its way onto one of my playlists, but this summer, inspired somewhat by Once Upon A Time... In Hollywood's excellent soundtrack of late-60s-era pop-psych gems, I've been revisiting my albums from the original psychedelic era (~'66-'69), and it, in particular screamed out (and banged on bongos, and wailed on guitar, etc.) to be played.

Neighborhoods, an incredible private-press album from the mid-70s, recorded right here in Portland, Oregon by jazz musician Ernest Hood, that weds musique concrète with new-age synths and zither (and a few other instruments). There are other albums from the original new-age era that incorporate field recordings (Ariel Kalma's Osmose, in which the sounds of a tropical rainforest are almost as much an instrument as Kalma's synths and sax, is an example par excellence) but none that I know of that use the sounds of an urban environment. It's almost certainly the greatest release yet by Freedom to Spend (the Portland-based sub-label of RVNG, Int'l run by Eternal Tapestry's Jed Bindemann and Yellow Swans' Pete Swanson), which is saying something, given their impressive track record so far.

A blast of maximalist drone from Vibracathedral Orchestra (which is out on Oaken Palace a label which donates all their profits to environmental causes), a band that will always have particular significance for me, as one of their albums was the first purchase (of what would be many, many, maaaaaaaaaaaaany more) I made from the late, great Aquarius Records (soon to be the subject of a documentary).

Finally... I have made a decision (that I may come to regret) to start offering my playlists (or a close approximation thereof) on Spotify. Because I draw from various sources for the music on my show, they'll be necessarily incomplete (not everything is on Spotify, an important lesson for you younger would-be music-o-philes). But, as I am (painfully) aware, not that many people want to download and listen to an entire two hour long radio show (how many people even have an mp3 player anymore, or an mp3-playing app on their phone?) and so for a lot of you Space Cadets™ Spotify might be more convenient. It might wound my ego slightly to see the download stats for my show decline, but the fact is, I'm all about the music, maaaaaaaan, so I don't really care how you listen.