psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present

:Episode One-Hundred Twenty One: 09.21.2018

Artist Title Album
Mt. MountainMoon DesireCosmos Terros
Orions BelteAtlantic SurfingMint
Le_MolThe Sun Like a Sneaky Keyhole View of HellHeads Heads Heads
Jay Glass DubsTemple DubPlegnic
ColleenGood Morning SunshineBabies EP
Popera CosmicAurore CosmicLes Esclaves
Os MutantesCavaleiros NegrosTudo Foi Feito Pelo Sol
Oneness Of JujuIncognitoAfrican Rhythms
Los IniciadosElla Es IntangibleLa Marca De Anubis
Simon FinnJerusalemPass The Distance
Hermann NitschAktion 6Orgien Mysterien Theater: Musik der 135. Aktion, Kuba
7FOFateMoment
Heavenly Music CorporationEnergy PortalLunar Phase
Listen at House of Sound

 

Description

Opening this week's show are Aussies Mt. Mountain (who have a name that's a throwback to early-2000s indie, when every band thought it was the height of cleverness to name themselves [adjective] [noun form of adjective] e.g. Hot Hot Heat, Magic Magicians, etc. To fit this template, I suppose that technically they would have to be the Mountainous Mountains, but Mt. Mountain is close enough) who have a new album coming out in a couple of months, but also had their 2016 debut repressed by Cardinal Fuzz. Their sound reminds me of The Black Angels covering Sleep (a la fellow Australians Buried Feather, who I believe I described as The Black Angels covering Dead Meadow - the Black Angels seem to have a bit of a following Down Under), or possibly the Velvet Underground covering Black Sabbath, depending upon how undiluted by time and reinterpretation you think their influences are. After this we hear some lovely Motorik sounds from Sweden's Orions Belte (whose name needs a [sic] after it, unless it's the case that Swedish doesn't use possessive apostrophes and spells "belt" with a terminal "e") and a compelling take on post-post-rock from Austrians le_mol, the first band played on the Space Program with an underscore in their name. Following this is Jay Glass Dubs, with yet more dub for people who don't necessarily like dub (and for people like me who do like dub but have a tremendous appreciation for his respectful yet novel take on it) and Colleen, whose first EP - which was recorded in 2002 but, like nearly all good avant-garde music sounds like it could have been laid down yesterday - was recently made available to streaming services and online stores.

The second set begins with Popera Cosmic, generally regarded to be France's first psychedelic band, whose debut album, Les Esclaves, considered an influence on Serge Gainsbourg and Magma, was recently reissued by Finders Keepers. We next hear from Os Mutantes, whose mid-70s output I enjoy, despite the fact that at that point they had only one original member and had all but completely abandoned their Tropicalia-heavy sound (also, because when I was in college in the early 2000s, their Luaka Bop best-of album was nearly inescapable, I have heard far more than enough of their early work). Next we get a dose of psychedelic soul jazz by Oneness of Juju, whose much-sampled debut album was recently reissued (with bonus tracks!) by Strut. Rounding the set out are early-80s Spanish minimal synth weirdos Los Iniciados and outsider psychedelic folkie Simon Finn, whose classic Pass The Distance is being reissued once again (since it really should never go out of print) by Superior Viaduct.

The last set starts with a first for the Space Program: some avant-garde (and in my mind, psychedelic-leaning) classical, by German artist/composer/provocateur Hermann Nitsch. As I say during the air break, I would actually recommend it to fans of Sunn O))) (who I would argue are, at least of late, heavily influenced by neo-classical sounds - see the album they recorded with Scott Walker, for instance). The show then concludes with some ambience from Japanese producer 7FO and 90s ambient revivalists (back when ambient music was consigned to the "new age" section of record stores) Heavenly Music Corporation.