psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present

:Episode One-Hundred Nineteen: 09.07.2018

Artist Title Album
Six Organs Of AdmittanceAbove A Desert I've Never SeenAsleep On The Floodplain
GhostRabirabiLama Rabi Rabi
FursaxaVeladaLepidoptera
Voice of The Seven ThundersCylindersVoice of The Seven Thunders
IslajaPalaa AurinkoonPalaa Aurinkoon
Kemialliset YstävätLentävät SudetKemialliset Ystävät
Hala StranaA Second FallHala Strana
Love Cry WantLove CryLove Cry Want
GrowingUntitled"Live"
Emerald WebPhotonosThe Stargate Tapes: 1979-1982
IasosRainbow CanyonInter-Dimensional Music through Iasos
AshraLotus (Parts I-IV)Blackouts
Listen at House of Sound

 

Description

As summer segues into autumn, I like to soundtrack my walks amongst the lengthening shadows and changing leaves with psychedelic folk, and so the first set consists of just that. We open with Six Organs of Admittance (aka Ben Chasny), and a track from one of his last "proper" folk albums, Asleep On The Floodplain, released before he developed his own Oblique Strategies-esque songwriting system and took his music in a significantly more avant-garde direction. Following this, we hear from Ghost (the Japanese psych-folk one, of course, not the Swedish metal one), with the not-quite title track, Rabirabi, from their mid-90s album Lama Rabi Rabi (a bit of an anachronistic record, the mid-90s being not exactly the heyday of psychedelic folk, or music generally) . This is followed by Philly Phreak-Pholkie Fursaxa, some UK folk rock from Voice of The Seven Thunders (via late, lamented Portland label Holy Mountain), and a bit of Finnish weirdo-folk from Islaja (who has since transitioned into making dubsteppy avant-pop) and Kemialliset Ystävät (which, as cool as that name sounds, translates to English as "Chemical Friends"... which is like the name of a 90s-era rave DJ collective). Finally, we close with Hala Strana, the erstwhile Eastern European-influenced folk guise of the hyper-prolific Steven R. Smith.

I preface the second set by telling the story of stumbling across, in the used bin of a downtown record store, an album that I had been looking for a physical copy of for years, Love Cry Want, the wildly psychedelic fusion jazz project of Larry Young, who played keys on Bitches Brew (though he is sliiiiiightly overshadowed in that role by Chick Corea). It was recorded in the summer of 1972 during a concert/protest whose aim was to levitate the White House, by blasting it with some screaaaamin' tunes, maaaan! from a park on the Capitol Mall (the attempted levitation of government buildings being something of a trend at the time) and is absolutely essential listening for anyone into, say, Miles Davis circa Live/Evil or Herbie Hancock circa Crossings. We then hear a live recording from Growing, a band I like to describe as Sunn O))) for people who prefer their drone a little more on the treble end of the tone spectrum.

The final set opens with Emerald Web, who are perhaps the epitome of the late-70s/early-80s "hippies discover keyboards"-era of electronic music. I mean, they went on a tour of planetariums and contributed music to the original, Carl Sagan-hosted Cosmos. You don't get much more "new agier," music-wise, than that. This is followed by fellow hippie-with-a-keyboard (and flute), Iasos, with a track from the album that is generally regarded as one of the first, genre-defining examples of "new age" music, 1975's Inter-Dimensional Music through Iasos. We end with yet another new ager, Manuel Göttsching (as much as I'm averse to the descriptor "new age" I don't see how you can get around being labeled as such when you release an album with that phrase in the title) and a four-part song suite from the album Blackouts (sometimes credited to his alter-ego, Ashra).